April 23, 2011

Betsy Cherry's Clock?


 Cherry -> Spencer -> Stone -> Howell

Peter Howell has this interesting heirloom clock made cir. 1864 in Connecticut by the S.C. Spring company.  This photo below taken by J. Spencer Howell during his last visit in 2010.

According to antiques.com which lists similar clocks:
"The company never issued a catalogue so its hard to know how many styles they made. Most of their clocks were sold to other clock manufacturers, so to find one with the S.C. Spring label in the case is a wonderful 'find' indeed...the image on the reverse-painted lower door glass reflects the type of work that was popular in that day...the clock features faux marble columns with gilded sections." 
S.C. SPRING COLUMN AND CORNICE 8-DAY WEIGHT CLOCK

Of special interest to our family: The clock has penciled service notations inside which often record the date and owner's name such as "3.10.92 - Cleaned, Mrs. Spencer Stone" (Flora Maude Campbell Stone 1872-1969). Another notation refers to "Mrs. Spencer." which could be interpreted to mean the aforementioned Mrs. Spencer Stone, but due to the age of the clock this could literally be Mrs. Spencer who was Betsy Cherry (1808-1893) who married William Spencer (1804-1846). Betsy Cherry Spencer outlived her husband William and daughter Adelaide Spencer (1833-1871).  After her daughter's death, Betsy Cherry Spencer moved in with her widowed son-in-law Thomas Stone and raised her grandson, Spencer Stone (1869-1939) from age 2. (Adelaide Spencer married Thomas Stone (1827-1899) and they had eight children before her death)

So the likely provenance of the clock is: William & Betsy (Cherry) Spencer -> Spencer & Maude (Campbell) Stone -> John E. & Elizabeth (Stone) Howell -> Peter & Lee (Johnson) Howell.

  
 
Posted by jhowell at 7:01 PM

January 26, 2011

Thomas & Spencer Stone's Store in Chatham


Stone -> Howell
 
Darcy McKeough mailed a copy of John Rhodes' article covering the history of the dry goods store once owned by Thomas and Spencer Stone.

 "It was, along with Eaton's (Austin's), one of the two anchor stores of King Street and for nearly 125 years it maintained that status."
   
Click here
 
The article appears in the September 15, 2010 issue of "Chatham Today" and can be read by clicking on the image above.
 

Posted by jhowell at 6:44 PM

August 28, 2010

Joseph Hickman House

Hickman -> Davison -> Howell   

I discovered today that The Canadan Register of Historic Places lists some very interesting details on the "Joseph Hickman House" and on the history of our Hickman family from New Brunswick, Canada.   We have fond memories from the Hickman Family reunion held here in August 2005.

Hickman house side view

The Joseph Hickman House in 2005

 The text below from the Historic Places listing...(links added)
The Joseph Hickman House was designated for its association with the Hickman family, for its association with the ship building industry, for its association in the lumber industry, for its association with farming and for its architecture. 
The Joseph Hickman House is recognized for its association with the Hickman family. This large white house was home to five generations of Hickman's. The house was built by Joseph Hickman (1821-1889) who married Ruth Caroline Wells in 1845. It was occupied by his son, John Howard (1859-1921), by his grandsons, William Marshall (1894-1952) and Robert Wells (1912-1975), and by his great-grandson Robert Stuart (1949- ) and his family. 
The Joseph Hickman House is also recognized for its association with the ship building industry. The Hickmans of Dorchester were merchants and businessmen, involved in politics and community organizations; however it is as shipbuilders that they acclaimed a world-renown reputation. In 1878, and for a few years thereafter, Canada could claim the fourth largest merchant marine in the world. Several coastal communities in New Brunswick, especially in the Bay of Fundy, had shipbuilding industries in 19th century. It is reported that approximately 30 shipbuilders have built over 80 vessels in Dorchester in the 19th century. William Hickman is reported to have built up to 25 vessels at Dorchester Island and four in Hillsborough. William Hickman was one of the most innovative and prolific ship builders in Atlantic Canada. 
Vessels built at the Hickman yard on Dorchester Island had reputation for being safe, sturdily-built craft made from the finest building materials and with quality workmanship. The Joseph Hickman House is recognized for its association with the lumber industry. Joseph Hickman and most of the Hickman descendants were farmers and tradesman and had share in several ships. They also contributed to shipbuilding by supplying timber and hardware. As early as 1840, Joseph Hickman operated a general store. It provided supplies for lumber camps and shipyards. In 1876, Joseph built a new hardware and specialty store. The Hickman's also owned sawmills in Dorchester and in Port Elgin. 
The Joseph Hickman House is recognized for its association with farming. The Hickman family had a large farm and was recognized as a model or "experimental" farm. In a document prepared at the time of his death in 1889, it is mentioned that Joseph Hickman's estate was worth $31,893 at the time. The Joseph Hickman House is recognized for its architecture. Built circa 1840, it is a good example of two-storey Neo-Classical residential architecture, exhibiting a depth of two rooms and using a strict symmetry arrangement of elements. The paneled front door is framed by a transom window with sidelights. Multi-pane windows are arranged symmetrically five across. The interior is lavishly finished with elaborate door and window moulding, intricate staircases, plaster crown moulding and rosettes, a plaster arch in the hallway and numerous fireplaces, including a rare cast iron fireplace made in Sackville.
The article also contains architectural details on the house and some photos.
Posted by jhowell at 7:28 AM

June 23, 2010

Matilda Turner


 Turner -> Burk -> Campbell -> Stone -> Howell  

Still trying to find more on Matilda Turner of Tavistock, Devon, England.  
 
Mathilda Turner

Matilda is the mother of Mirrette Burk and grandmother of Flora Maude Campbell Stone (our Granny Stone). She appears in the 1861 Canadan Census, Harwich, Kent County, Ontario as "Matlilda Burk, born England, age 37". 

She also appears in the 1880 US Census in Alameda, California as "M. Burke, White, Female, Age 58, wife, married, b. England, father and mother b. England"  

The 1841 England Census shows 4 Turner's listed in Tavistock: Matilda Turner, F, age 15, b. Devon; Mary Turner, F, age 60, b. outside census county; John Turner,m, age 55, Farmer, b. Devon; Jane Turner, F, age 15, female servant, b. Devon.  

Our Matilda could be the one listed in the England Census age 15 (so born cir 1826) but there is no way to tell until we surface more.
Posted by jhowell at 10:50 PM

October 3, 2009

Dr. John Guy Jackson, Jr. unravels our Veazey's

Veazey -> McBride -> Howell
Interesting how the pieces start to fit together….Albert Sidney Howell, Jr.’s (1898–1981) grandmother was Margery Elizabeth Veazey (1825–1898).  Sidney traced his Veazey ancestors to James Veazey, born Aug 25, 1725 in Cecil County Maryland and who died in 1790 near Powelton, Georgia.  The details are documented in his typed manuscript which was provided (p1), (p2) to us in February 2007 by Jim Brittain (noted here).

Unfortunately I could find no relationship between Albert Sidney Howell’s Veazeys, and our ancestor, Elizabeth C. “Betsy” Veazey McBride a.k.a. “Grandma Eley”.  Betsy Veazy, her many marriages and her ancestors were basically a mystery until I received an email from Dr. John Guy Jackson in April this year, who explained:

I am a gg-grandson of John McBride and Elizabeth C. 'Betsy' Veazey via their daughter Melissa Frances McBride (Elmina McBride Howell's sister); Melissa Frances married John Stephen Jackson in Taliaferro County on 14 Apr 1840.

Dr. Jackson further explained that he had written My Search For John Stephen Jackson, His Ancestors and His Descendants, and that the Veazey’s and McBrides were well documented in Chapter 9. Last weekend I received a copy and can hardly put it down!  Chapter 9 contains 178 pages of text including extensive source references and photocopies of original documents.  Here are a few of the things I learned about the Veazeys (also lots on the McBrides..but that is for later):
  1. 'Betsy' Veazey had 4 husbands and seven children. She was left a widow twice, and divorced once. She Married (1) John McBride ca 1813 in Greene Co.; six children (Elmina, Alonzo Church, Melissa Frances, Mary Elizabeth, Susan C, and Julia J).  Mr. McBride died 26 Jun 1828 at Indian Springs. She m(2) Fauntleroy F. Chain in Fall 1831 in Houston Co.; one daughter (Angelina). Mr. Chain died Jan 1835. She m(3) Neil Ard 26 Oct 1837 in Houston Co.; divorced in 1838. She m(4) James J. Eley 9 Jun 1842 in Taliaferro Co.; he died in 1873. She died 21 Jan1869 at age 70."

  2. Captain Abner Veazey (1776-1832) is Betsy's father who married Delilah Rhodes in 1797 in Organge Co., North Carolina. There were two daughters - Mary born about 1798 and our ancestor Betsy born about 1799. Captain Veazey served as a citizen soldier in the Georgia Militia and was called into active service on three separate occasions: 1) in 1813 during the Creek Indian Wars, 2) in the Federal Service during the war of 1812 and 3) in 1818 during the First Seminole War.
    Abner Veazey was also a prominent member of the American Colonization Society, which was formed to: 1) suppress the slave trade, and 2) to aid in legally freeing slaves, and 3) to remove free Negroes from the United States to Liberia. "Listed among the charter members of the Putnam County branch were such prominent men as John McBride (Abner Veazey's son-in-law)...Rev. Alonzo Church...Rev. Coleman Pendelton..."

  3. Elijah Veazey (born 1745/50 in Cecil Co., MD; d. 1801) and Frances Hester were Captain Abner Veazey's parents. They were married in Granville Co. NC and had 7 children (Elizabeth, Abner, Mark, Ezekiel, William Rebecca, Fielding). As a boy Elijah moved with his parents to Granville Co., NC. The 1800 US Census in the Dutch District of Granville County NC shows five males, three females plus five slaves in Elijah's household

  4. Edward Veazey (1721-1779) and Ann (1723-1787) were Elijah's parents. Edward's birth is recorded in the records of St. Stephens Episcopal Church in Cecil Co., Maryland. Edward and Ann had four children (Ann, Elijah, Elizabeth Lee, Rachel). During the 1750's Edward migrated to what is known as 'Veazey Ridge' (now in Butner, NC), in the Knap of Reeds Community, Granville Co., NC. Here he purchased 320 acres in 1759 and another 200 acres in 1762. It is likely that Edward and Ann are buried in an old Veazey cemetery on Veazey Ridge.

  5. James E. Veazey (d. 1766) and Mary Mercer (d. 1766) were Edward's parents. They had 8 children (Martha, Thomas, Edward, Elizabeth, James, William, Mary, Araminta) And here is where we discover that the James Veazey b. 1725 in Albert Sidney Howell’s genealogy is the same as the James in this family. (see family group sheet). This was our missing link and with this knowledge we now can connect Albert Sidney Howell's Veazey's and ours.

  6. John Veazey (1647-1700) born in Essex, England, and Martha Broccus were James E. Veazey's parents. They had 5 children (William, George, Edward, James E., Robert). In 1687 John Veazey purchased a tract of land (quoting Guy Jackson) “in the southern portion of Cecil Co., MD, on the eastern side of the Elk River and on the south side of the Bohemia River near the point where the Bohemia empties into the Elk, the tract being part of a neck of land knon as ‘Veazey’s Neck’.” Their home was named Cherry Grove and was occupied by his descendants until about 1900. 

View Veazey Neck in a larger map
Map showing "Veazey's Neck" and "Veazey Cove"

Coincidentally when we lived in Philadelphia, Jack Howell and I would trailer the Lazer II to Elk Neck State Park on Turkey Point and spend the day sailing in the Elk River - just opposite Veazey's Neck.
Veazey Neck is listed as such on NOAA navigational charts.
So now, thanks to cousin Dr. John Guy Jackson, we know much more about our Veazey line going all the way back to John Veazey born 1647 in Essex, England and who settled in Cecil County, MD, and who is the 10x great grandfather of the youngest of our Howell's today! (chart).

 

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Posted by jhowell at 2:27 PM

September 17, 2009

5x Great Grandmother - Elizabeth C. Veazey

Betty Howell Traver had another surprise for us in her album – a photo of Elizabeth C. Veazey who married John McBride (1793– 1828).  She was married several times after John McBride died – but so far the only other name I have for her is ‘Great Grandmother Eley’.

Elizabeth Veazey is the 5x great grandmother of the youngest members of our Howell line today.  See chart here.5Gens

Elizabeth Veazey McBride

Elizabeth Veazey McBride

 

Posted by jhowell at 11:33 PM

Albert Sidney Howell Jr.'s - McKinney Howell chart

During a visit last week, Betty Howell Traver and Jim Brittain provided a copy of a handwritten Howell chart from the records of Albert Sidney Howell, Jr. The starting point is McKinney Howell.  The chart re-confirms much of what we already know, and provides the names of some “new” cousins including: Reed, Holden, Madison and Grimes.

The chart should be of interest to Julia Howell Traylor Dyar, as well as Mark McBride Howell as it shows their lines.

SidneyHowellChartSM

A full size copy of the chart can be viewed here.

Posted by jhowell at 6:12 PM

Magnolia Cemetery - Thompson

Thompson -> Heard -> Howell

William Thompson (1781–1839) and his wife Hannah Brooks (1789–1872) are the 4x great grandparents of the Howell’s in my generation.  I learned last week during a visit with Jim Brittain and Betty Howell Traver that they are buried in the Magnolia Cemetery, Augusta, Georgia, along with many of their family.  

Jim Brittain provided photos and a plot map – The photos are now linked back to the database entry for each person.

The marker describing the plot reads: 

“William and Hannah Thompson and the following members of their family, Edmund Heard, Ellen Heard, Henry Heard, Hannah Heard, Daniel B. Thompson, Elizabeth Thompson, Sarah Thompson, Mary Thompson, Jane Thompson, James Thompson, Jane Thompson, Sarah J. Lathrop”

ThompsonGravesite-13

 

Posted by jhowell at 3:50 PM

July 27, 2009

Google Books - Sacrifice of the Shannon

Hickman -> Davison -> Howell

Wonderful to discover that “Sacrifice of the Shannon” by William Albert Hickman, is now available in its entirety as a free download from books.google.com.  (more details in my 2005 post)

SacrificeOfTheShannonCoverOnGoogle

Posted by jhowell at 4:59 PM

July 25, 2009

The Campbell's From Auchindrain - updated PDF

Campbell -> Stone -> Howell

Thanks to cousins Ted Lollis and Warren Hamilton I was able to borrow one of the original copies of “The Campbell’s From Auchindrain” by Emily Campbell Price (discussed in a genealogue entry here) and scan it, in color, to PDF – much better than the previous copy posted that was on microfilm. The complete manuscript (72 mb) can be downloaded here.

The Campbells From Auchindrain - Cover 

Posted by jhowell at 12:12 PM