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William Heard Kilpatrick, Phd.

William Heard Kilpatrick, Phd.[1, 2, 3]

Male 1871 - 1965  (93 years)

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  • Name William Heard Kilpatrick  [4, 5
    Suffix Phd. 
    Born 20 Nov 1871  White Plains, Greene County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 5
    Gender Male 
    Degree 1891-1892  Macon, GA Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    A.B. 
    Occupation 1892-1897  [6
    Teacher, Georgia Public Schools 
    Occupation 1903-1905  Macon, GA Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Acting President, Mercer University 
    Occupation 1897-1906  Macon, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Professor of mathematics, Mercer University 
    Degree 1912  New York, NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Ph.D., Columbia University 
    Occupation 1909-1938  New York, NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Professor, Teachers College, Columbia University 
    Died 13 Feb 1965  New York, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 8
    Person ID I1151  Main
    Last Modified 6 Apr 2006 

    Father Rev. James Hines Kilpatrick, D.D.,   b. 18 Oct 1833, Burke County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Mar 1908, White Plains, Greene County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Mother Edna Perrin Heard,   b. 30 Apr 1843, Augusta, Richmond, Georgia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Mar 1925, White Plains, Greene County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Married 20 Dec 1870  Augusta, Richmond, Georgia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Family ID F474  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Mary Beman Guyton, "Marie",   b. 12 Nov 1874, Marianna, FL Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 May 1907, Columbus, GA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 32 years) 
    Married 27 Dec 1898  Marianna, FL Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Margaret Louise Kilpatrick,   b. 13 Jan 1901, Marianna, FL Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Oct 1983, Willtown Bluff, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     2. William Heard Kilpatrick, Jr.,   b. 1 Jan 1903,   d. 7 Jan 1903  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 18 Feb 2003 
    Family ID F476  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Margaret Manigault Pinckney,   d. 24 Nov 1938 
    Married 1908 
    Last Modified 18 Feb 2003 
    Family ID F477  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Marion Ysabelle Ostrander,   b. 23 Dec 1891,   d. 29 Jan 1975  (Age 83 years) 
    Married 1940 
    Last Modified 18 Feb 2003 
    Family ID F478  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 20 Nov 1871 - White Plains, Greene County, GA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDegree - A.B. - 1891-1892 - Macon, GA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 27 Dec 1898 - Marianna, FL Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Acting President, Mercer University - 1903-1905 - Macon, GA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Professor of mathematics, Mercer University - 1897-1906 - Macon, GA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDegree - Ph.D., Columbia University - 1912 - New York, NY Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Professor, Teachers College, Columbia University - 1909-1938 - New York, NY Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 13 Feb 1965 - New York, NY Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Dr. Kilpatrick
    Dr. Kilpatrick
    In China.
    William Heard Kilpatrick
    William Heard Kilpatrick
    William Heard Kilpatrick & Eleanor Roosevelt
    William Heard Kilpatrick & Eleanor Roosevelt
    Caption from Georgia Archives reads: "April 4, 1949. Award presentation at the Eleanor Roosevelt Testimonial Dinner sponsored by the Bureau for Intercultural Education. Left to right: Edwin R. Embree, William Heard Kilpatrick presenting awards to Mrs. Roosevelt, Bernard Baruch, John Foster Dulles. Kilpatrick was born in White Plains (Green County), Ga. He was internationally educator. He taught in Georgia public schools, Mercer, and Columbia University."
    William Heard Kilpatrick cir 1900
    William Heard Kilpatrick cir 1900
    At John's Hopkins University cir. 1900. (Photo: Museum and Archives of Georgia Education, Milledgeville, Georgia & reproduced in "And there were giants in the land..." by John A. Beineke.)
    Kilpatrick Family in White Plains, Georgia cir 1901
    Kilpatrick Family in White Plains, Georgia cir 1901
    1. Margaret Louise Kilpatrick (granddaughter of James H. Kilpatrick & Edna P. Heard), 2. Clifford Elizabeth Hunter, 3. Helen Kilpatrick (daughter of JHK & EPH), 4. Marie Guyton Kilpatrick (wife of William Heard Kilpatrick), 5. Mary Acton (cousin of WHK), 6. Sarah Kilpatrick (daughter of JHK & EPH, 7. William Heard Kilpatrick (son of JHK & EPH), 8. Susie Hunter (cousin of WHK) 9. Cornelia Howell "Nellie" ( dau. of William Shepard Howell), 10. Edna Perrin Heard Kilpatrick (2nd wife of JHK), 11. Howard Kilpatrick (son of JHK & EPH), 12. Macon Kilpatrick (son of JHK and 1st wife Cornelia Hall) 13. Rev. James Hines Kilpatrick. (Photo from H.K. Baumeister collection)
    1.I1151.jpg
    1.I1151.jpg

    Documents
    Henry Alonzo Howell letter re Kilpatrick House.
    Henry Alonzo Howell letter re Kilpatrick House.
    Written to Wm. Heard Kilpatrick, 7 Sep. 1939. Return address 148 Randolph St.(Cuthbert, GA)

    Sent to me by Scott Kilpatrick, March 2006

    Headstones
    William Heard Kilpatrick
    William Heard Kilpatrick

    Histories
    William Heard Kilpatrick (1871-1965)
    William Heard Kilpatrick (1871-1965)
    14 page essay (pdf) by Landon E. Beyer on the life of Heard Kilpatrick and his contribution to the field of education. Originally published by Prospects: the quarterly review of comparative education (Paris, UNESCO: International Bureau of Education), vol. XXVII, no. 3, September 1997, p. 470-85

  • Notes 
    • p. 229 from a section of The History of Greene County, GA titled Hisotry of the White Plains School by Miss Helen Kilpatrick. "

      "....In 1887, the school observed the first Georgia Arbor Day, and the large oaks in from of the building were planted.  A number of trees were set out but only those of Dr. Howell, Will M. Grant, J. Howell Mapp, William Heard Kilpatrick, Charles Sterling Jernigan and John Pardee lived."

      http://www.pragmatism.org/genealogy/columbia.htm
      http://lweb.tc.columbia.edu/cs/sc/Exhibits/China/photogallery.html

      The following from:
      Books In Print database, (c) 2002 R.R. Bowker LLC
      Title: And There Were Giants in the Land:
      The Life of William Heard Kilpatrick
      Author(s): Beineke, John A. , Author
      Publication: New York : Peter Lang Publishing, Incorporated Publisher Record

      William Heard Kilpatrick (1871-1965) was, during his long career, the chief interpreter & disseminator of John Dewey's educational thought. Known as "Columbia's Million-Dollar Professor" because of the great popularity (& revenue) of his classes at Teachers College, Kilpatrick vigorously promoted the progressive educational message that schools must be more child-centered, democratic, & socially oriented. This transplanted native of Georgia was the center of controversy over several decades. As a young man he underwent a heresy trial in the South for his unconventional theological beliefs. During the Great Depression he came under attack by conservatives for his active leadership in the radical Social Reconstructionist movement. And near the end of his life, he was assailed by McCarthyites for his social views & challenges to the traditional curriculum. Since his death, critics have accused Kilpatrick's legacy of departing from Dewey's message & encouraging anti-intellectualism by classroom practitioners. Kilpatrick is one of the major figures in twentieth-century American education & his ideas continue to frame the debate on educational reform as we enter the twenty-first century.

      The following from: http://www.education.miami.edu/ep/html/william_heard_kilpatrick.html

      William Heard Kilpatrick was born in White Plains, Georgia in 1871 and died in 1965. As a child, he was deeply influenced by the extremely different personalities of his parents.  From his strict minister father, he learned the value of hard work, discipline and clear thinking.  His mother provided the balance to his father’s sternness and from her he learned compassion, relationship, connection to others and self-confidence.  It is these attributes that are the foundation for Kilpatrick’s work ethic and teaching.  While attending Mercer University, he read Charles Darwin’s The Origin of Species and was changed forever.  As a result, he realized that he did not have to be “religious” and he could still have high moral and social standards. He graduated Mercer University in 1871 and with a $500 loan from one of his brothers, he left for graduate school at John Hopkins University.

      At John Hopkins, his interest in evolutionary science and “open-ended intellectual inquiry” was developed.  As a result, he denounced the formal religious practice of his family and sought more secular ways of believing and living.  After graduating John Hopkins, he became a teacher, principal and college instructor.  During this time, he discovered the teachings of Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi and Francis Parker. These individuals were the inspiration of his teaching philosophy: Learning best occurs when engaged in meaningful experiences that allow the development of student responsibility in the planning, production and completion of the experience.  When he was a principal at an elementary school, he was instrumental in having report cards eliminated.  He always had high standards for students and trusted their choices and methods. Kilpatrick also believed in living by the same principals that he taught students and engaged in continued study and philosophical exchanges with colleagues while in these demanding positions.

      It was during a summer break from teaching that he enrolled in a summer session at the University of Chicago, where he first met John Dewey. As the story goes, he took a class with Dewey and found him difficult to understand and got discouraged.  He did not believe that Dewey was a good lecturer!  A few years later, he decided to go to Columbia University Teachers College and ran into Dewey once again.  This time, however, instead of getting discouraged, he took on the challenge of interpreting Dewey to others. In doing so, he became a protégé of Dewey and a leader in the progressive education movement. He is credited with popularizing Dewey’s theory. Kilpatrick received his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1912.  His dissertation is entitled “The Dutch Schools of New Netherland and Colonial New York.”  From 1909, he taught at Teachers College, Columbia and became professor of the philosophy of education in 1918. 

      Kilpatrick is best known for “The Project Method” which was formally presented in 1918 in an essay appearing in the Teacher’s College Record. Dewey’s theory of experience was the springboard for the theory of “The Project Method”.  In “The Project Method”, Kilpatrick explained that the interest of children should be at the center of the project approach.  This interest serves as the “unit of study.” By utilizing topics of interest, learning becomes more relevant and meaningful. Solving problems within a meaningful social context is how knowledge is best constructed. “Purposeful” learning, therefore, becomes the motivational factor for children to engage in the project. According to Kilpatrick, there are four phases to a project:  “purposing, planning, executing and judging.  The student ideally, should initiate all phases, not the teacher. 

      Kilpatrick also believed in a democratic classroom environment that takes into consideration individuality, but does not perpetuate the notion of individualism.  In other words, everyone is recognized as having individual thoughts and concepts, but these must be weighed and considered toward the common goals and values of the classroom.  Teachers must be reflective and philosophical to make sure that teaching ensures continued growth for both student and teacher. It is no surprise that Kilpatrick is considered one of the most popular professors ever at Teachers College. His practice of respect, trust and democracy endeared him to many.  However, he is not beloved by all, with many experts in the field criticizing his methods and practices.  In The Schools We Need and Why We Don’t Have Them, E. D. Hirsch is highly critical of the progressive approach and Kilpatrick in particular. [10, 11]

  • Sources 
    1. [S2] JSH Feb 13 2003 gedcom, John S. Howell, Jr.

    2. [S24] Cloptonfamily.org, (The Clopton Family Association - http://www.cloptonfamily.org/amerline/), http://www.cloptonfamily.org/amerline/pafg11.htm#2670 (Reliability: 3).
      664. William Heard Kilpatrick  (Edna Perrin Heard, Edmund Heard, Edna Perrin , Mary Clopton , William  , Walter  , William ) was born on 20 Nov 1871 in White Plains, GA.

      William married Mary (Marie) Beman Guyton on 27 Dec 1898 in Marianna, FL. Mary was born on 12 Nov 1874. She died on 29 May 1907.

      They had the following children:

         904 F i Margaret Louise Kilpatrick
         Margaret married Theodore Baumeister.
         905 M ii William Heard Kilpatrick was born on 1 Jan 1903.
      He died on 7 Jan 1903.

    3. [SAuth] John Spencer Howell, Jr., John Spencer Howell, Jr., (http://www.jhowell.com/ jhowell@jhowell.com).

    4. [S693] Gravestone Photo, White Plains Bapt. Church Cem - "William Heard Kilpatrick, son of Rev. James Hines and Edna Perrin Heard Kilpatrick, November 20, 1871 -  February 13, 1965" (Reliability: 0).

    5. [S1347] Clopton Ancestors by Lucy Lane Erwin, Lucy Lane Erwin, (c 1939), p. 197 (Reliability: 0).

    6. [S694] Mercer University Web Site.

    7. [S694] Mercer University Web Site, http://tarver.mercer.edu/special_collections/MercerPresidents/kilpatrick.htm (Reliability: 3).
      William Heard Kilpatrick, Acting President 1903-1905


      Born November 20, 1871, White Plains, Georgia, to James Hines and Edna Perrin (Heard) Kilpatrick. Married December 27, 1898, to Marie Beman Guyton. Married November 26, 1908, to Margaret Marigault Pinckney. Married May 8, 1940, to Marion Y. Ostrander. Children: two. Died February 13, 1965, New York, New York.
      William Heard Kilpatrick received the A.B. (1891) and A.M. (1892) degrees from Mercer University in Macon, Georgia, and the Ph.D. degree (1912) from Columbian University.
      Kilpatrick was a teacher and principal in Georgia public schools (1892-97). He returned to Mercer University as professor of mathematics (1897-1906) and served as acting president (1903-05). He went to Teachers College, Columbia University, in 1909 and taught there until his retirement in 1938.
      Kilpatrick originated the project method of education, a rejection of traditional subjects as the curriculum pattern. He wrote many books, including The Dutch Schools of New Netherland and Colonial New York (1912), The Montessori System Examined (1914), Froebel's Kindergarten Principles Critically Examined (1916), Source Book in the Philosophy of Education (1923), Foundations of Method (1925), Education for a Changing Civilization (1926), How We Learn (with Mason Olcott, 1928), Our Educational Task (1930), Education and the Social Crisis (1932), Remaking the Curriculum (1936), Group Education for a Democracy (1940), Selfhood and Civilization (1941), and Philosophy of Education (1951), and he was editor and coauthor of The Educational Frontier (1933), The Teacher and Society (1937), Intercultural Attitudes in the Making (1947) and a founder of The Social Frontier.
      He helped found Bennington (Vermont) College, a leading progressive college, and was president of its board of trustees (1931-38). He was a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Physical Education Association, a member of the board of the Progressive Education Association, and president of the New York Urban League (1941-51). He was chairman of the Bureau of Intercultural Education (1946-54) and the board of American Youth for World Youth (1946-51). He received the Brandeis Award (1953) and four honorary degrees.

      Bibliography: LE (III); NYT, February 14, 1965, p. 92; WWAE (XIV); WWW (IV); "Memorial Issue on William Heard Kilpatrick," Educational Theory 16 (January 1966); New Catholic Encyclopedia (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1967); Leslie R. Perry, ed., Bertrand Russell, A. S. Neill, Homer Lane, W. H. Kilpatrick: Four Progressive Educators (New York: Macmillian, 1967); Samuel Tenenbaum, William Heard Kilpatrick (New York: Harper, 1951).
      Joseph C. Bronars, Jr.
      Source of biography: Bronars, Joseph C. Jr. "William Heard Kilpatrick." Biographical Dictionary of American Educators. Vol. 2. Ed. John F. Ohles. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1978. Material used by permission of Greenwood Publishing Group.
      Source of photograph: Special Collections file, Jack Tarver Library, Mercer University, Macon, Ga. Photograph taken from portrait located in Mercer University Administration Building.

    8. [S1347] Clopton Ancestors by Lucy Lane Erwin, Lucy Lane Erwin, (c 1939), p. 197 "d. 13 Feb 1965" - Betty Howell Traver addition (Reliability: 0).

    9. [S1344] Hannah Brooks Birthday Manuscript, (On file JSHJr. electronic copy available.), "Attach C" (Reliability: 0).

    10. [S699] Rice & Williams - History of Greene Co., Thaddeus Brockett Rice and Carolyn Williams, (IBSN 0-87152 Data by Thaddeus Brockett Rice ; edited by Carolyn White Williams (Mrs. Carlton Candler Williams) ; with new index by Margaret H. Cannon), p. 229 (Reliability: 0).

    11. [S703] Beineke - And there were giants in the land:, Beineke, John A., (Publisher: New York : P. Lang, c1998. Description: Book ix, 500 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.).