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William I De Normandie, "The Conqueror"

William I De Normandie, "The Conqueror"[1, 2, 3]

Male 1024 - 1087  (62 years)

Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name William I De Normandie 
    Suffix "The Conqueror" 
    Born 14 Oct 1024  Falaise Castle, Falaise, Normandy, Franc Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 9 Sep 1087  Priory Of St. Gevais, Rouen, Normandy Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I1355  Main
    Last Modified 30 Sep 2009 

    Father Robert I Of Normandy The Magnificent,   b. 1003, Normandy, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jul 1035, Nicaea, Bythinia, Turkey Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 32 years) 
    Mother Herleva Of Falaise,   b. Abt 1003, Conteville, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Family ID F579  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Matilda Of Flanders Vlaandren,   b. 1031, Flanders, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Nov 1083, Caen, Normandy, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years) 
    Children 
    +1. King Henry I Beauclerc, of England,   b. Sep 1068, Selby, "Salisbury", Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Dec 1135, St Denis-Le-Fermont, Near Gisors Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 67 years)
    +2. Adela,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 30 Sep 2009 
    Family ID F571  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 14 Oct 1024 - Falaise Castle, Falaise, Normandy, Franc Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • From Wikipedia.org
      William I of England

      Authority: King of England and Duke of Normandy

      William I (c. 1027 - September 9, 1087), was a King of Briton, known alternatively as William the Conqueror and William the Bastard. He was the illegitimate son of Robert the Magnificent, duke of Normandy, and Herleva (or "Arlette"), the daughter of a tanner named Fulbert; he was born in Falaise, Normandy (now in France).
      He married Matilda of Flanders, they had four sons and six daughters (see list below).

      He succeeded his father to the dukedom as a young boy in 1035 and was known as Duke William II of Normandy. He immediately came under attack from the vassals. With the assistance of King Henri I of France, William finally secured control of Normandy by defeating the rebel Norman barons at Caen the battle of Val-ès-Dunes in 1047.

      Upon the death of William's cousin king Edward the Confessor of England (January 1066), William claimed the throne of England, asserting that the childless Edward had named him his heir during a visit by William (probably in 1052) and that Harold Godwinson, England's foremost magnate, had reportedly pledged his support while shipwrecked in Normandy (c. 1064). He made this pledge whilst in captivity and was reportedly tricked into swearing on a saint's bones that he would give the throne to William. Even if this story is true, however, Harold made the promise under duress and was so free to break it.

      In order to pursue his claim, William invaded England on September 28 and defeated King Harold Godwinson at the Battle of Hastings (October 14, 1066), thus allowing him to seize the throne. This was the beginning of what is now known as the Norman Conquest. His victory is commemorated in the Bayeux Tapestry.

      William initiated many major changes, amongst them a fundamental review of the prevailing Anglo-Saxon legal system, which he fused with Norman law. In 1085, in order to ascertain the extent of his dominion, William commissioned the compilation of the Domesday Book, a survey of England's productive capacity similar to a modern census. He also ordered the building of a number of castles, among them the Tower of London.

      He died at the Convent of St. Gervais, near Rouen, France, on September 9, 1087 from injuries received when he fell off a horse at the Siege of Mantes. He is buried at St. Stephen's, Caen, Normandy, now in France.

      William was succeeded in 1087 as king of England by his younger son William II and as duke of Normandy by his elder son Robert Curthose, who had earlier rebelled. His youngest son Henry also became king of England later, after William II died without any child to succeed him.

  • Sources 
    1. [S2] JSH Feb 13 2003 gedcom, John S. Howell, Jr.

    2. [S1052] Roderick N. Lawson, (http://www.afn.org/~lawson/).

    3. [SAuth] John Spencer Howell, Jr., John Spencer Howell, Jr., (http://www.jhowell.com/ jhowell@jhowell.com).