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William Hickman

William Hickman[1]

Male 1823 - 1903  (79 years)

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  • Name William Hickman  [2, 3, 4, 5
    Born 12 Sep 1823  Dorchester Parish, Westmorland, New Brunswich, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [6, 7, 8, 9
    Gender Male 
    FamilySearch ID LTFP-8K4 
    Lived in Dorchester, New Brunswich, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    The Bell Inn 
    Occupation Dorchester, New Brunswich, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Innkeeper 
    Occupation 1867  [4
    Shipbuilder 
    Occupation 1871  Dorchester, Westmorland, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Shipbuilder 
    Occupation 1881  Dorchester, New Brunswich, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [12, 13
    Shipbuilder 
    RETI 1889  [14
    Died 1903  [15, 16, 17
    Person ID I2904  Main
    Last Modified 7 Aug 2017 

    Father John Hickman,   b. 1786, County Derry, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Sep 1856  (Age 70 years) 
    Mother Mary Campbell,   b. 1791, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1856  (Age 65 years) 
    Documents
    Map of Dorchester Co, New Brunswick, Canada
    Map of Dorchester Co, New Brunswick, Canada
    Family ID F1173  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Mary Emma Wells,   b. 1829, Westmorland County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Apr 1854, Dorchester, New Brunswich, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 25 years) 
    Married 16 Jun 1850  Sackville, Westmorland, New Brunswick Find all individuals with events at this location  [18
    Children 
     1. William Howard Hickman,   b. 26 Feb 1853,   d. Nov 1853  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 25 Mar 2005 
    Family ID F1182  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Sarah Jane Bennett,   b. Abt 1837,   d. 8 Dec 1864  (Age ~ 27 years) 
    Children 
     1. John Hickman,   b. 1856,   d. 1856  (Age 0 years)
     2. William Bennett Hickman,   b. Abt Jan 1857,   d. 5 Dec 1862  (Age ~ 5 years)
    Last Modified 24 Mar 2005 
    Family ID F2002  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Margaret Furnes,   b. Abt 1826,   d. 9 Sep 1870  (Age ~ 44 years) 
    Married 1865  Westmorland County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [19
    Notes 
    Married:
    • Allen I. Jack notes:

      "His only child, Charles S Hickman, is the son of his third wife, whose maiden name was Margaret Furnes." [20]
    Children 
    +1. Charles Smith Turner Hickman,   b. Aug 1870,   d. 1941  (Age ~ 70 years)
    Last Modified 5 Apr 2005 
    Family ID F1974  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 Harriet Frances Cochran,   b. 1830, Dorchester, New Brunswich, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1901  (Age 72 years) 
    Married 24 Sep 1872  [21, 22
    Last Modified 27 Mar 2005 
    Family ID F1975  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 12 Sep 1823 - Dorchester Parish, Westmorland, New Brunswich, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLived in - The Bell Inn - - Dorchester, New Brunswich, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Innkeeper - - Dorchester, New Brunswich, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 16 Jun 1850 - Sackville, Westmorland, New Brunswick Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1865 - Westmorland County, New Brunswick, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Shipbuilder - 1871 - Dorchester, Westmorland, New Brunswick, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Shipbuilder - 1881 - Dorchester, New Brunswich, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Bell Inn - Built 1811
    Bell Inn - Built 1811
    Judy Hickman Morison notes: "William Hickman(1823-1903) the ship builder - lived in what is now the Bell Inn which is currently a recognized historical building (the oldest stone building in NB and perhaps originally Acadian) and has a very good restaurant listed in Where to Eat In Canada."
    William Hickman
    William Hickman
    Bell Inn - interior as a restaurant
    Bell Inn - interior as a restaurant
    William Hickman's house was converted into a restaurant called the Bell Inn.
    Bell Inn Restaurant - interior
    Bell Inn Restaurant - interior
    William Hickman's house was converted into The Bell Inn restaurant.

    Headstones
    Mary Emma Wells Hickman & Sarah Jane Bennett Hickman
    Mary Emma Wells Hickman & Sarah Jane Bennett Hickman
    1st and 2nd wives of William Hickman

  • Notes 
    • From Allen I. Jack p. 181-182:

      "William Hickman, for many years one of the most energetic and enterprising business men of Dorchester, NB, is now living retired from active pursuits, although much of his leisure time is occupied in attending to his private interests.  He was born September 12, 1823, in Dorchester, a son of John Hickman, Jr. an early settler of this section of Westmorland County. "

      "Of their nine children three are now living; namely, William, the special subject of this sketch; Mary Jane; and Susan."

      "William Hickman was educated in the public schools of Dorchester.  For about four years during his youth and early manhood he followed the sea.  He subsequently embarked in the hotel business in Dorchester, and also engaged to a considerable extent in ship building.  The latter industry proved so engrossing that Mr. Hickman disposed of his hotel, in order that he might give his whole time to commercial and manufacturing pursuits.  He built four ships at Lower Hillsboro and twenty-five barques and ships on Dorchester Island.  For several years he was the leading spirit in the development of the shipping trade, which was then at its height in this part of the country, and not only built ships, but stocked them and sent them to foreign ports.  He established an extensive domestic and foreign trade, which he continued for some time.  He was also interest in various town enterprises until his retirement from active pursuits in 1889.  Fraternally, he was a Mason, belonging to the Dorchester Lodge, F & AM." 

      "Mr. Hickman has been four times married.  His present wife was formerly Miss Harriet Cochrane of Dorchester.  His only child, Charles S Hickman, is the son of his third wife, whose maiden name was Margaret Furnes."

      From Wood Ships & Iron Men:

      "A prominent builder and ship-owner who begab operations in the sixties was William Hickman of Dorchester, NB.  Hickman was born in 1823, and followed the sea for a time.  He left and engaged in the hotel business, and then began to build ships at Lower Hillsborough on the Petitcodiac River.  One of his vessels built there was the barque Fanny Atkinson, 626 tons, launched in 1865.m  Later, he began building on Dorchester Island, and constructed altogether some 25 ships and barques.  Among those build in the sixties might be mentioned the following:  1867, barque Thomas Cochran, 627 tons; 1868, barque Maggie Chapman, 780 tons; 1869, barque Sarah M Smith, 774 tons.  The Maggie Chapman was abandoned in the North Atlantic in Febraury 1878 while bound for Philadelphia to Antwerp.  William Hickman was one of the leading New Brunswick ship-owners, fitting out and operating his own vessels."

      Marlene Hickman notes the book Wood Ships & Iron Men goes on to confirm other ships that William built:

      "..barque Charlie Hickman, 904 tons, for himself. (p.237)......
      "..at Dorchester, built the ship John Rutherford, 984 tons...(p. 239)......Gideon Palmer and William Hickman, both of Dorchester, NB, woned many vessels, as also did Robert A Chapman of Rockland. (p.249)....Sarah Chambers, 1000 tons, built at Dorchester for Wm Hickman of that place.(p.250)...Wm Hickman, at Dorchester, built the ship Wm K Chapman, 1077 tons.(p.257).......William Hickman, at Dorchester, built the bqrque William Cochran, 1091 tons; (p260)"

      From July 31, 1879 Chignecto Post (transcribed by Marlene Hickman):

      "Mr. Hickman's New Vessel - A splendid new ship is nearly completed by Wm. Hickman, Esq., Dorchester Island, and will be launched next month. She is 180 feet keel, 22 hold, 38 beam and will register 1250 tons. She classes eight years in French Lloyds. As far as possible she modelled after the "W K Chapman" - being 1 foot deeper and 10 feet longer, which was a very successful carrier as well as quick sailor. She is decidely full and will be a great carrier and has splendid lines running fore and aft in a free handsome curve. She is copper fastened up 16 feet. Her iron knees - a superior article - has been supplied by Fraser, of New Glasgow. Every pains have been taken to make her as perfect as a wooden ship can be. She has four tiers of Kellson's extra fastened; extra hooks and pointers; 12 inch ceiling, edge bolted to lower deck; oak and pitch pine bits, oak hatches, pitch pine spars, oak keel, oak stem, oak stern, oak aprons, &c &c. In giving her strength that she may last, much work has been done beyond the requirements of the survey. The forward house on deck is 36 x 17 and 6 feet high. It is divided into six apartments; for coal, carpenter's shop, galley, and two state rooms, and forecastle for seamen. The cabin is 35 x 28. First there is the dining room 12 x 12, next the saloon 11 x 12, next the Captain's cabin 11 x 12. Besides these, there are seven state rooms, pantry and store room. The cabins are finished in white pine, and painted and grained by Mr. Jas. Cook. The poop contains 4 tanks, each containing 500 gallons. The appointments and fittings of the cabin, &c are all of the most modern character. The master builder is Mr. Jas. Chambers, who has build no less than 15 ships for Mr. Hickman - in fact his whole fleet, and of this number all are yet afloat except two - the "J C Lamb", which went down in mid-ocean and was never heard from and the "Maggie Chapman" - whose rudder becoming disabled last winter was abandoned at sea. The success of this fleet of vessels has been in a great measure owing to the skill and painstaking care of their builder."

      JSH Note:

      During the period of his life, most of the shipping tonnage in the world was predominantly via wooden Sailboats.  In the 1870's 84%, 1890's 55%.  By 1900 there was still 38% of freight going via sail but by then, New Brunswick's shipbuilding boom came to an end.  The wooden ships of the time were being replaced by steel-hulled ships.

      Notes from Chignecto Post Sept 14 1876:

      "Thirty seven new vessels (all but five are large barques) are owned at Dorchester. Of these Wm Hickman Esq is manager of ten, Gideon Palmer Esq seven and R A Chapman Esq, twelve."

      From Irish Canadian Cultural Association:

      "2) William Hickman born 12 Sep 1823: m. (1st) - , (2nd) - , (3rd) Margaret Furness: had 1 son: (4th) Harriet Cochrane of Dorchester"

      From "The Museum Called Tantramar - Part Two", by Bill Hamilton:

      "One difficulty experienced by visitors to this area is their acceptance of the fact that Dorchester and Sackville in particular, were thriving seaports and that shipbuilding was once a major industry at the head of the Bay of Fundy. During the peak of the "Golden Age of Sail" as many as eight shipyards were operating in the vicinity of Dorchester alone. Three of the major builders were: R. A. Chapman, William Hickman, and Gideon Palmer. "

      From Bill Hamilton, Memories Of A Dorchester Traveller: Part I:

      "Browsing through tourism brochures, visitors to Dorchester have been known to question references to the village's role during the "Golden Age of Sail." Statements such as: "It was shipbuilding that made Dorchester famous around the world," cause the skeptical to ask: "How could there be shipbuilding without a harbour?"

      "Tour guides, having heard this before, point to a map, and patiently explain that the centre of the community was once Dorchester Island. "It's . . . just down the road. And yes, . . . although landlocked today; it was a bustling home port for ships that sailed the seven seas." Age of sail historian Stanley Spicer attests that "at least 109 vessels were built in Diorchester. Of these, 68 came from Dorchester's three major shipyards; owned by the Palmer, Chapman and Hickman families."

      "Dorchester's shipbuilding heritage was brought to my attention recently through a remarkable diary. Covering the last phase of the Age of Sail, from January 01, 1870 through to December 31, 1894; it records how and why, shipbuilding and international trade became the lifeblood of a prosperous community, once the shiretown of Westmorland County."

      "On the surface, the diarist was an unlikely recorder of this era. A farmer and businessman; he once sailed aboard the barque "John Hickman" as ship's carpenter. But for Alexander Black (1838-1902) this was not all; for he possessed many talents and mastered more than one occupation. In addition, Black had an interest in music, art, politics and law. If an important trial was in progress at the old Westmorland County Court House, Alexander Black was certain to be a spectator. Well read, and largely self educated, he had an excellent command of language and always expressed himself in a cryptic, but engaging manner."

      Marlene Hickman notes:

      New Brunswick author, Charles G D Roberts, was raised in the Tantramar region, at Westcock, in the late 1800's. In 1906 he published a novel - "The Heart That Knows" - in which he refers to the Dorchester area and in particular the Hickman ships. It provides, perhaps, some insight to a trip on a Hickman ship.

      In Chapter XXVII "Seth Goes to Sea", Seth, the hero of the story,

      "secured a berth on a Dorchester ship, of Hickman's, which was loading deals in St John for the long voyage round the horn to Calcutta……

      ..The ship which carried Seth from St. John was a fine barque, named the "ilver Queen", one of a fleet of Queens, - Fundy Queen, Sackville Queen, Dorchester Queen, Hopewell Queen, - built in Dorchester, registered in Dorchester, and owned by the Hickmans.

      Her Captain was William Estabrooks, one of the Sackville Estabrookses …… There was no particular hardship in faring as a mere "able- bodied seaman" on one of these well-built, well-found, well-sailed Bay of Fundy ships.

      The voyage, from Seth's point of view, ……. - was comparatively uneventful. Off Hatteras they encountered a blow which taught Seth what a storm at sea was really like, and drove the "Silver Queen" about five days off her course. But Captain Estabrooks knew how to handle his ship, and the ship was staunch, and there was at no time any imminent peril.

      They touched at Barbados for fresh water. About ten degrees south of the equator they ran into a series of dead calms, where-in they would sizzle for a week at a time, with slatting sails and groaning spars, rolling like a log on an oily swell. Then, with the decks blistering their feet, the crew would course in complicated, ingenious, hair-raising oaths, and express themselves read to sell their immortal souls for a sniff of Fundy fog.

      In the struggle to round the Horn, they were driven far south, buffeted by swooping gales, and staggering amid the mountainous leaden seas, roaring up from the Antarctic, for nearly six weeks. Then, at last, the great Cape relented and let them pass.

      With half a gale behind them, and a clear sky overhead, they ran up the Pacific coast and shaped their course across the vast for India.

      Thenceforward winds favoured them, and without delay or misadventure, they raced free up the Bay of Bengal and made for the mouth of the Hoogly. At Calcutta the "Silver Queen" got a cargo of tea, spices, sandalwood, and Indian rugs and stuffs, for Liverpool.

      But here Seth parted company with her. He had shipped for the voyage only. Captain Estabrooks tried to induce him to sign again, saying that from Liverpool he would probably get freight for St John……"

      William Hickman lived in what is now known as "The Bell Inn" built in 1811. 

      In 2005 The Bell Inn is a restaurant listed in "Where To Eat in Canada".

      Judy Hickman Morison notes:

      "William Hickman (1823-1903) the ship builder - lived in what is now the Bell Inn which is currently a recognized historical building (the oldest stone building in NB and perhaps originally Acadian) and has a very good restaurant listed in Where to Eat In Canada."

      From Bowser, 1986:
      "Prior to being his residence it served as a stagecoach stop, tavern, and hotel." [20, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27]

    FamilySearch ID:

  • Sources 
    1. [SAuth] John Spencer Howell, Jr., John Spencer Howell, Jr., (http://www.jhowell.com/ jhowell@jhowell.com).

    2. [S811] Vital Statistics From New Brunswick (Canada) Newspapers, Daniel F. Johnson, (P.O. Box 26025, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada E2J 4M3 vitstats@nbnet.nb.ca), vol. 72 (Reliability: 0).

    3. [S1162] Hutchison 1865-1866 Directory of New Brunswick, Thomas Hutchinson, (1866. (Index online at archives.gnb.ca)), Hickman, William  - Dorchester Westmorland Shipbuilder (There is also listed a Wm. Hickman, Shipbuilder in Lower Hillsborough, Albert Co., NB) (Reliability: 0).

    4. [S1163] Hutchison 1867-1868 Directory of New Brunswick, compiled by James A.T. Bird, (1868 (index online archives.gnb.ca)), Lists the following Hickman's in NB (all Dorchester, Wetmorland): Albert J (law student), John (deputy treasurer), Joseph (merchant), Thomas (law student), William (shipbuilder) (Reliability: 0).

    5. [S646] Lovell's 1871, John Lovell (Compiler), (John Lovell, Montreal, 1871.), Lists Hickman's in Dorchester, Westmorland as follows: Albert (Barrister), John (Collector of Customs), Joseph (storekeeper), William (shipbuilder). (Reliability: 0).

    6. [S1129] Irish Canadian Cultural Association, (http://www.newirelandnb.ca/), "2) William Hickman born 12 Sep 1823: m. (1st) - , (2nd) - , (3rd) Margaret Furness: had 1 son: (4th) Harriet Cochrane of Dorchester" - http://www.newirelandnb.ca/names_w.html (Reliability: 0).

    7. [S622] 1881 Canadian Census, (1881), William HICKMAN M Male Irish 53 New Brunswick Ship Builder Church of England (Reliability: 0).
      1881, Dorchester
      William HICKMAN M Male Irish 53 New Brunswick Ship Builder Church of England
      Harriett HICKMAN M Female English 52 New Brunswick Church of England
      Charles HICKMAN Male Irish 11 New Brunswick Church of England
      Annie B. MCDORNELL Female Scottish 22 New Brunswick Servant Baptist

    8. [S1147] Barbara Trenholm - Trenholm, Barbara Trenholm, (www.trenholm.org - stray cat genealogy), "b. 12 Sep 1823, Dorchester P., Westm. Co., NB; Irish  "  http://www.trenholm.org/ (Reliability: 0).

    9. [S1157] Charlie Hickman, (Charlie Hickman [chickman@nbnet.nb.ca]), (1851 Census) -- from "joseph_1821.pdf" file emailed to JSH - 29 Mar 2005 (Reliability: 0).

    10. [S1155] Judy Hickman Morrison, "William Hickman(1823-1903)the ship builder - lived in what is now the Bell Inn which is currently a recognized historical building (the oldest stone building in NB and perhaps originally Acadian) " (Reliability: 0).

    11. [S1161] Allen Jack - Biographical Rev. NB, I. Allen Jack, QC, DCL, (Published 1900 by the Boston Biographical Review Publishing Company, 15 Court Square, Boston, MA 1900), "embarked in the hotel business in Dorchester" (Reliability: 0).

    12. [S622] 1881 Canadian Census, (1881), William HICKMAN M Male Irish 53 New Brunswick Ship Builder Church of England (Reliability: 0).

    13. [S1162] Hutchison 1865-1866 Directory of New Brunswick, Thomas Hutchinson, (1866. (Index online at archives.gnb.ca)), Hickman, William  - Dorchester Westmorland Shipbuilder (Reliability: 0).

    14. [S1161] Allen Jack - Biographical Rev. NB, I. Allen Jack, QC, DCL, (Published 1900 by the Boston Biographical Review Publishing Company, 15 Court Square, Boston, MA 1900), "He was also interest in various town enterprises until his retirement from active pursuits in 1889" (Reliability: 0).

    15. [S811] Vital Statistics From New Brunswick (Canada) Newspapers, Daniel F. Johnson, (P.O. Box 26025, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada E2J 4M3 vitstats@nbnet.nb.ca), vol. 72  - so d. after 1901 (Reliability: 0).
      651   Joseph HICKMAN, one of the old residents of Dorchester (West. Co.) died Sept. 4. He was some years ago engaged in shipbuilding. During the past few years, however, owing to failing health, he has not been engaged in business. The deceased leaves a son, John H. HICKMAN and a daughter, Mrs. W.D. DOUGLAS of Amherst, N.S. Three brothers also survive him, John HICKMAN and William HICKMAN of Dorchester and James S. HICKMAN, Amherst, as well as two sisters,  Mrs. W.J. WELDON, Moncton and Mrs. W.B. DIXON, Sackville.12 September 1889 LEAF

    16. [S1150] 1901 Census - New Brunswick, Census Index "DO1-6-27  HICKMAN William 76 Harriett" - http://www.rootsweb.com/~nbwestmo/cen1901.htm (Reliability: 0).

    17. [S1155] Judy Hickman Morrison, "1823-1903" (Reliability: 0).

    18. [S1147] Barbara Trenholm - Trenholm, Barbara Trenholm, (www.trenholm.org - stray cat genealogy), "m.16 Jun 1850, Sackville, Westm. Co., NB11692"  http://www.trenholm.org/ (Reliability: 0).

    19. [S1164] Marriage Bonds 1810-1932 New Brunswick, Provincial Secretary - bond administration records, "Hickman, William, Year 1865, Groom, Westmorland Co.,, Dobson, Margaret Jane, Bride, Westmorland Co.," (Reliability: 0).

    20. [S1161] Allen Jack - Biographical Rev. NB, I. Allen Jack, QC, DCL, (Published 1900 by the Boston Biographical Review Publishing Company, 15 Court Square, Boston, MA 1900), p. 181-182 (Reliability: 0).

    21. [S1138] Don Chapman, (http://www3.telus.net/chignecto/), http://www3.telus.net/chignecto/chapman/aqwg25.htm (Reliability: 0).

    22. [S1151] New Brunswick - Births, Deaths, Marriages, New Brunswick Provincial Archives, (http://archives.gnb.ca/), "Name:COCHRANE, HARRIETT F. Role:BRIDE Origin:WESTMORLAND COUNTY" (Reliability: 0).

    23. [S1154] Bill Hamilton, William B. "Bill" Hamilton, (http://www.billhamiltonflashback.ca/ - 1998–2005), http://www.billhamiltonflashback.ca/listnews.php?id=129&offset=0 (Reliability: 0).

    24. [S855] Cleadie Barnett - Dorchester Cemetery, Compiled by Cleadie Barnett, CG(C), from Douglas Ayer's records, (New Brunswick GenWeb - http://www.rootsweb.com/~nbwestmo/cem-dorchester.htm).

    25. [S1167] Chignecto Post, (New Brunswick, Canada), 14 Sep 1876 "Thirty seven new vessels....." (Reliability: 0).

    26. [S1154] Bill Hamilton, William B. "Bill" Hamilton, (http://www.billhamiltonflashback.ca/ - 1998–2005), http://www.billhamiltonflashback.ca/listnews.php?id=117&cid=&searchtext=&offset=0 (Reliability: 0).

    27. [S1487] Wood Ships & Iron Men, Frederich William Wallace, (Originally published in 1937 by Charles E. Lauriat Co., Boston, MA. Re-published 1973 by Mika Publishing, Belleville,Ontario, Canada. ISBN 0-919302-67-X).